I Once was Blind but, Now I See

The Gospel of John 9 – True Blindness (MSG)

1-2 Walking down the street, Jesus saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked, “Rabbi, who sinned: this man or his parents, causing him to be born blind?”

3-5 Jesus said, “You’re asking the wrong question. You’re looking for someone to blame. There is no such cause-effect here. Look instead for what God can do. We need to be energetically at work for the One who sent me here, working while the sun shines. When night falls, the workday is over. For as long as I am in the world, there is plenty of light. I am the world’s Light.”

6-7 He said this and then spit in the dust, made a clay paste with the saliva, rubbed the paste on the blind man’s eyes, and said, “Go, wash at the Pool of Siloam” (Siloam means “Sent”). The man went and washed—and saw.

Soon the town was buzzing. His relatives and those who year after year had seen him as a blind man begging were saying, “Why, isn’t this the man we knew, who sat here and begged?”

Others said, “It’s him all right!”

But others objected, “It’s not the same man at all. It just looks like him.”

He said, “It’s me, the very one.”

10 They said, “How did your eyes get opened?”

11 “A man named Jesus made a paste and rubbed it on my eyes and told me, ‘Go to Siloam and wash.’ I did what he said. When I washed, I saw.”  12 “So where is he?”  “I don’t know.”

13-15 They marched the man to the Pharisees. This day when Jesus made the paste and healed his blindness was the Sabbath. The Pharisees grilled him again on how he had come to see. He said, “He put a clay paste on my eyes, and I washed, and now I see.” 16 Some of the Pharisees said, “Obviously, this man can’t be from God. He doesn’t keep the Sabbath.”

Others countered, “How can a bad man do miraculous, God-revealing things like this?” There was a split in their ranks.

17 They came back at the blind man, “You’re the expert. He opened your eyes. What do you say about him?”

He said, “He is a prophet.”

18-19 The Jews didn’t believe it, didn’t believe the man was blind to begin with. So they called the parents of the man now bright-eyed with sight. They asked them, “Is this your son, the one you say was born blind? So how is it that he now sees?”

20-23 His parents said, “We know he is our son, and we know he was born blind. But we don’t know how he came to see—haven’t a clue about who opened his eyes. Why don’t you ask him? He’s a grown man and can speak for himself.” (His parents were talking like this because they were intimidated by the Jewish leaders, who had already decided that anyone who took a stand that this was the Messiah would be kicked out of the meeting place. That’s why his parents said, “Ask him. He’s a grown man.”)

24 They called the man back a second time—the man who had been blind—and told him, “Give credit to God. We know this man is an impostor.”

25 He replied, “I know nothing about that one way or the other. But I know one thing for sure: I was blind . . . I now see.”  26 They said, “What did he do to you? How did he open your eyes?”

27 “I’ve told you over and over and you haven’t listened. Why do you want to hear it again? Are you so eager to become his disciples?”  28-29 With that they jumped all over him. “You might be a disciple of that man, but we’re disciples of Moses. We know for sure that God spoke to Moses, but we have no idea where this man even comes from.”   30-33 The man replied, “This is amazing! You claim to know nothing about him, but the fact is, he opened my eyes! It’s well known that God isn’t at the beck and call of sinners, but listens carefully to anyone who lives in reverence and does his will. That someone opened the eyes of a man born blind has never been heard of—ever. If this man didn’t come from God, he wouldn’t be able to do anything.”

34 They said, “You’re nothing but dirt! How dare you take that tone with us!” Then they threw him out in the street.   35 Jesus heard that they had thrown him out, and went and found him. He asked him, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”  36 The man said, “Point him out to me, sir, so that I can believe in him.”

37 Jesus said, “You’re looking right at him. Don’t you recognize my voice?”

38 “Master, I believe,” the man said, and worshiped him.  39 Jesus then said, “I came into the world to bring everything into the clear light of day, making all the distinctions clear, so that those who have never seen will see, and those who have made a great pretense of seeing will be exposed as blind.”  40 Some Pharisees overheard him and said, “Does that mean you’re calling us blind?”  41 Jesus said, “If you were really blind, you would be blameless, but since you claim to see everything so well, you’re accountable for every fault and failure.”

I Once was Blind but, Now I See

Lent IV – Year A – John 9

Science and medicine can do amazing things today and we are probably more likely to think in terms of scientific solutions to problems than to signs and wonders.  Both are gifts from God and miraculous.  The gospel lesson for today reveals God’s ability to bring healing to a blind man.

We catch up with Jesus and the disciples in John chapter nine.   The passage starts out stating that as they walked along they saw a man blind from birth and the disciples asked, ““Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?”

It was a common religious idea that sin caused physical defects and sickness.   The disciples have seen Jesus at work with others – doing other signs and yet they default to what they have been taught before.  They revert back to the old ways of handling things.  So instead of imagining that this person could be made whole,– they figure he is blind for a reason so they want to focus on what that reason is.  Don’t we focus more on the purpose of suffering than the suffering person?  We think “Why would this happen to someone? instead of thinking, – what can I do to help bring healing to the situation?

In this instance of healing, the blind man does not ask to be made whole – Jesus offers it.   That alone is pretty amazing I am sure for this man who is blind and is probably used to being treated as invisible.  Jesus approaches him and makes mud and puts it on the man’s eyes and then commands him to go to Siloam and wash it off.  When he does – he can see for the first time.

The neighbors of this man do not recognize him now that he can see.

What is going on here?  Did they pay so little attention to him before or are they just so incredulous about the miracle? – there must be another explanation? – this is not the man this is just someone who looks like him.  Do the people think that because the man was blind he was not intellectually developed enough to tell the story of how he was healed?? Is this an ignorance and prejudice thing?

Or is the question about whether this is a legitimate healing?  Maybe he wasn’t really all that blind after all – maybe Jesus just fixed a bad vision problem but did not actually HEAL the blind man.

They do not listen as the man attempts to satisfy their curiosity – I am he!  – hmm sounds remarkably like Jesus when he answers his accusers – I am he!!!  They do not hear Jesus and like him they do not hear or, ironically, see this man who is now able to see.

They would rather talk about him then to him.  To speak to him – to converse which includes listening – is to open up and build relationship with him – relationship takes work and understanding.    I suspect that sometimes this is also the case for us. We want to know the news about so and so but we would much rather hear it from someone else than to go and hear it firsthand.  It might take effort – it make take relationship – it might take extra time or listening to them.   In what ways do we avoid building relationship with individuals in our community?  In what ways would we rather talk about the person than talk to them??

In the gospel the neighbours decide to take him to the Pharisees – they question the man who declares that Jesus is a prophet

Then they question the parents of the man – who are terrified to say anything – if they pronounce Jesus as the Christ then they will be put out of the synagogue and so will their son.

So they hand it off to their son – he is an adult ask him.  They do not want to be responsible for having him kicked out of the synagogue. What does this mean for them – their identity as parents –as parents  of the man born blind – they get a new identity too – now they will be the parents of the man who was healed by Jesus –  are you someone who likes attention or not?

I know my mother in law used to shrink back when my husband liked to stand up in the cart and sing at the top of his lungs – some people do not like to be noticed – they like to fly under the radar – what about you?

When the situation is difficult and your answer could result in dire consequences – what is your testimony?  What is your witness?

The Pharisees demand that the man, “Give glory to God! We know that this man is a sinner.

And he says – One thing I know I once was blind but now I see  –

If these words sound familiar it’s because John Newton chose them for his hymn Amazing Grace.  John Newton had been a slave trader who had come to realize the error of his ways and repented of his activity in slave trade and through the experience with William Wilberforce and the abolition of the slave trade became an outspoken force against slavery. His blindness was not physical blindness but of spiritual blindness to the sin of slavery and his part in it.

I have told many people that one of my favourite verses is found in Job,

“I have spoken things I did not understand”.  I have discovered in my

life that I have used pat answers or championed a particular cause only to have my “eyes opened” to the truth of the situation later.   When God opens our eyes to the truth then we realize how blind we were.  This is what Jesus is illustrating for those around him.  Although they think they can see clearly, they are in fact blind to who he is.

Our testimony can only be what we know –– it is not a theological treatise – it might not answer all the questions but we can speak what we have experienced – the blind man knows that however it happened – he used to be blind but now he can see – how can someone refute that?  This is the power of testimony.  This is a good reminder – we don’t have to have all the answers or know how it all works but we tell what we know – what we have seen and heard.

The blind man says, “Here is an astonishing thing! You do not know where he comes from, and yet he opened my eyes. 31We know that God

does not listen to sinners, but he does listen to one who worships him and obeys his will. 32Never since the world began has it been heard that anyone opened the eyes of a person born blind. 33If this man were not from God, he could do nothing.”

He challenges the logic of the Pharisees – you don’t know but how can you refute this evidence? – I am healed and it has never happened before – therefore this man is from God!!!

Where have we felt blind in our lives? Where have we experienced a sense of new sight, new life, or new opportunity to be the person we have been called to be?  This is our testimony – this is our witness to others.  And if for some reason you question whether you have had that experience – if you feel like you are still blind and stumbling around in the dark, let me assure you that Jesus still comes to those in need to grant sight, faith, and life to all those who ask.  Let us be brave and inquisitive and call out to God when we need to see clearly – ask and  you will receive, seek and you will find, knock and the door will be opened.  May we allow God to open our eyes to the ways that we have been blind and may we rejoice together as we say, I once was blind but now I see.  Amen.

 

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revbethpessah

A transplanted Canadian living in sunny Florida. An Episcopal priest, wife, mother, dog lover, story teller and avid movie watcher.

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