“I Still Have Many Things To Say…”

The First Reading from I Samuel 15:34- 16:13

34Then Samuel went to Ramah; and Saul went up to his house in Gibeah of Saul. 35Samuel did not see Saul again until the day of his death, but Samuel grieved over Saul. And the Lord was sorry that he had made Saul king over Israel.  The Lord said to Samuel, “How long will you grieve over Saul? I have rejected him from being king over Israel. Fill your horn with oil and set out; I will send you to Jesse the Bethlehemite, for I have provided for myself a king among his sons.” 2Samuel said, “How can I go? If Saul hears of it, he will kill me.” And the Lord said, “Take a heifer with you, and say, ‘I have come to sacrifice to the Lord.’ 3Invite Jesse to the sacrifice, and I will show you what you shall do; and you shall anoint for me the one whom I name to you.” 4Samuel did what the Lord commanded, and came to Bethlehem. The elders of the city came to meet him trembling, and said, “Do you come peaceably?” 5He said, “Peaceably; I have come to sacrifice to the Lord; sanctify yourselves and come with me to the sacrifice.” And he sanctified Jesse and his sons and invited them to the sacrifice.  6When they came, he looked on Eliab and thought, “Surely the Lord’s anointed is now before the Lord.” 7But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for the Lord does not see as mortals see; they look on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.” 8Then Jesse called Abinadab, and made him pass before Samuel. He said, “Neither has the Lord chosen this one.” 9Then Jesse made Shammah pass by. And he said, “Neither has the Lord chosen this one.” 10Jesse made seven of his sons pass before Samuel, and Samuel said to Jesse, “The Lord has not chosen any of these.” 11Samuel said to Jesse, “Are all your sons here?” And he said, “There remains yet the youngest, but he is keeping the sheep.” And Samuel said to Jesse, “Send and bring him; for we will not sit down until he comes here.” 12He sent and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and had beautiful eyes, and was handsome. The Lord said, “Rise and anoint him; for this is the one.” 13Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the presence of his brothers; and the spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward. Samuel then set out and went to Ramah.

The Word of the Lord.          Thanks be to God.

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Mark 4:26-34

26He also said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, 27and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. 28The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. 29But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”  30He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? 31It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; 32yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”  33With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; 34he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

The Gospel of Christ            Praise to you Lord Christ

A homily by Mother Beth – “I Still Have Many Things to Say….” Mark 4

It is difficult to know what to say to you as I am called on to something new.  When we started on this journey in October 2016 I had no idea that God would lead me here to this day at this time.  I remember a familiar reading that I have clung to and mused over in John 16:12-15 and one line in particular stands out to me, “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now.”  I knew from the beginning of this journey that God was leading and that there was more to His plan than what I could see or understand at the time.

The readings from today offer further insight into the great mystery of God and His kingdom and how He plans to bring it about.  In the Samuel reading from this week, the people had called for a King because they wanted to be like the other nations around them.  They wanted to have an earthly leader instead of relying on God and the prophets to lead them.  The people chose Saul – who was every bit the image of a Royal.

HE had the stature and the looks.  IN the reading from today we hear that God has chosen someone else to replace Saul and we get a picture of how God chooses a leader and how different that is from how the people choose.

God chooses differently then we might expect.   We hear in the Samuel passage that “the Lord does not see as mortals see”.   We look on the outward appearance but God looks on the heart. Last week I spoke about God renewing us inwardly day by day and this passage in Samuel fits well with that.  God chooses based on the transformation that can happen or has happened in the heart.   As other have said, He qualifies the chosen – he calls each of us – not because we have it all together – not because we are the best and the brightest – he calls us because he sees the heart and recognizes – surrender and willingness to fulfill his will.   HE calls us not so that we will fulfill OUR plan but so that we will fulfill HIS plan.

God chose David for that very reason.  He knew that David would be willing to seek God’s wisdom and advice and obey and follow God’s direction.  He knew that David – for all his mistakes and missteps – would keep coming back to being open and honest before God.

God will not be controlled.  He does what is unexpected.

One year I planted herbs and when the plants began to grow, it become obvious that somehow a tomato plant had grown as well.  One or two little seeds must have fallen into the packet and I didn’t realize what it was until it was well on its way to being a full blown plant.    Once the fruit came on the plant there was definitely no denying that it was indeed a tomato and not the parsley or sage that it had been planted with.

Today in the readings Jesus tells the people the Kingdom of God is like someone who sows seed and then goes out day after day and discovers that the seed has grown into a plant.   This is the miracle of seeds that you can look into that ground day after day and see nothing and then suddenly, one day there is a green shoot – new life and before you know it – comes the harvest.   Now I realize that farming today is not this simplistic but think back to when you first planted a bean plant in grade school or the first time you planted a flower or vegetable garden from seed.  The early days seem like an endless wait and yet we know that something is happening below the surface of the soil.  The growth is starting on the inside, in the darkness before it is seen above ground.   So we do not lose heart – we walk by faith and not by sight.

In the second parable Jesus tells us that the Kingdom of God is like a mustard seed.  It starts out small but grows into something large.  Mustard like many other invasive plants can take over every place it is allowed to go.  This is a great image of the Kingdom of God.  Jesus is reassuring us that the Kingdom will grow and spread – that once it starts – like that mustard bush – it will multiply and spread and it all starts with one seed.

And although we like to think that we are entirely responsible for the spreading or growing of the Kingdom of God, the truth is God does it.  God does what is unexpected and He will not be controlled by people or the church.  God has a mission and He will bring His plan about with or without us.   He wants us to partner with him. He calls us to be open and willing to fulfill His plan.

For so long we as the church have thought in terms of the church being the mission – we have thought that the whole point of all of this was to get people to come to church.  But the truth is, we as the church should be fulfilling God’s mission – to introduce people to God – to provide an opportunity to meet God and to go from this place and live abundantly in our communities.   God’s mission is not limited within the walls of the church.

The beauty of the parable of planting a seed and then going on with the day to day duties of your life is that it shows us the regularity being about the things of God.  It is in our daily coming and going that the true life of faith is lived.   We make it hard on ourselves.  We think it is about a huge evangelistic meeting or that we need to be at the church every day of the week – that is what it means to be called or to work with God on His mission.  But the truth is, God is looking at the heart, He is calling to you and I to live our lives faithfully in the community.  God is doing the hard work – He invites us to be part of the big and unexpected things by planting a seed – by loving each other, by extending to a friend or neighbour, by standing strong in the face of trials or troubles.  He calls us to be part of the big picture by being faithful in our little corner of the field – what little seed has God given you to plant today?

As we faithfully plant those seeds in the lives of others – in the lives of the community, God will be faithful to provide the growth and His kingdom will spread and grow to the ends of the earth.  Amen.

Pentecost V – Don’t you care that we are perishing?

The First Reading from I Samuel 17:1a, 4-11, 19-23, 32-49

Now the Philistines gathered their armies for battle; they were gathered at Socoh, and there came out from the camp of the Philistines a champion named Goliath, of Gath, whose height was six cubits and a span. 5He had a helmet of bronze on his head, and he was armed with a coat of mail; the weight of the coat was five thousand shekels of bronze. 6He had greaves of bronze on his legs and a javelin of bronze slung between his shoulders. 7The shaft of his spear was like a weaver’s beam, and his spear’s head weighed six hundred shekels of iron; and his shield-bearer went before him. 8He stood and shouted to the ranks of Israel, “Why have you come out to draw up for battle? Am I not a Philistine, and are you not servants of Saul? Choose a man for yourselves, and let him come down to me. 9If he is able to fight with me and kill me, then we will be your servants; but if I prevail against him and kill him, then you shall be our servants and serve us.” 10And the Philistine said, “Today I defy the ranks of Israel! Give me a man, that we may fight together.” 11When Saul and all Israel heard these words of the Philistine, they were dismayed and greatly afraid.  19Now Saul, and they, and all the men of Israel, were in the valley of Elah, fighting with the Philistines. 20David rose early in the morning, left the sheep with a keeper, took the provisions, and went as Jesse had commanded him. He came to the encampment as the army was going forth to the battle line, shouting the war cry. 21Israel and the Philistines drew up for battle, army against army. 22David left the things in charge of the keeper of the baggage, ran to the ranks, and went and greeted his brothers. 23As he talked with them, the champion, the Philistine of Gath, Goliath by name, came up out of the ranks of the Philistines, and spoke the same words as before. And David heard him.  32David said to Saul, “Let no one’s heart fail because of him; your servant will go and fight with this Philistine.” 33Saul said to David, “You are not able to go against this Philistine to fight with him; for you are just a boy, and he has been a warrior from his youth.” 34But David said to Saul, “Your servant used to keep sheep for his father; and whenever a lion or a bear came, and took a lamb from the flock, 35I went after it and struck it down, rescuing the lamb from its mouth; and if it turned against me, I would catch it by the jaw, strike it down, and kill it. 36Your servant has killed both lions and bears; and this uncircumcised Philistine shall be like one of them, since he has defied the armies of the living God.” 37David said, “The Lord, who saved me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear, will save me from the hand of this Philistine.” So Saul said to David, “Go, and may the Lord be with you!” 38Saul clothed David with his armor; he put a bronze helmet on his head and clothed him with a coat of mail. 39David strapped Saul’s sword over the armor, and he tried in vain to walk, for he was not used to them. Then David said to Saul, “I cannot walk with these; for I am not used to them.” So David removed them.  40Then he took his staff in his hand, and chose five smooth stones from the wadi, and put them in his shepherd’s bag, in the pouch; his sling was in his hand, and he drew near to the Philistine. 41The Philistine came on and drew near to David, with his shield-bearer in front of him. 42When the Philistine looked and saw David, he disdained him, for he was only a youth, ruddy and handsome in appearance. 43The Philistine said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come to me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods. 44The Philistine said to David, “Come to me, and I will give your flesh to the birds of the air and to the wild animals of the field.”45But David said to the Philistine, “You come to me with sword and spear and javelin; but I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. 46This very day the Lordwill deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you down and cut off your head; and I will give the dead bodies of the Philistine army this very day to the birds of the air and to the wild animals of the earth, so that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel, 47and that all this assembly may know that the Lord does not save by sword and spear; for the battle is the Lord’s and he will give you into our hand.”  48When the Philistine drew nearer to meet David, David ran quickly toward the battle line to meet the Philistine. 49David put his hand in his bag, took out a stone, slung it, and struck the Philistine on his forehead; the stone sank into his forehead, and he fell face down on the ground.

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Mark 4:35-41

35On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” 36And leaving the crowd behind, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. Other boats were with him. 37A great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that the boat was already being swamped. 38But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion; and they woke him up and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” 39He woke up and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm. 40He said to them, “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” 41And they were filled with great awe and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”   The Gospel of Christ     Praise to you Lord Christ

Pentecost V- Homily by Mother Beth

Recently I felt compelled to set a new goal for myself.  I decided that one of my new goals is to get strong – physically healthy and strong but also strong in the way I handle things – brave, if you will.  And of course, as soon as I set that as a goal – as soon as I started talking to a few people about it… do you know what happened?  I had to face some situations in which I had to be strong.

The disciples in today’s gospel are in a similar situation.  They have been listening to Jesus teaching about the kingdom of God and what that is like – that have been journeying with Jesus as he has performed miracles and set people free and then Jesus, at the end of a long day says, let’s go across the lake to the other side.  Let’s move on – Let’s continue our journey elsewhere.

So the disciples get into a boat with Jesus or rather they took him with them in a boat.  “And a great windstorm arose and the boat was being swamped.  But he was in the stern, asleep on a cushion.”

The disciples call out to Jesus – “Don’t you care that we are perishing?”  And Jesus woke up and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!”

Notice that Jesus does not speak to the disciples first – He speaks to the storm.  Jesus is God – the creator of the universe – he speaks directly to the weather – to the wind and the sea.

Then he turns toward the disciples and says, “Why are you afraid?  Have you still no faith?”

Psalm 121 says,  “I lift my eyes up to the mountains.  Where does my help come from?  My help comes from the Lord – the maker of heaven and earth.”

II Corinthians 12:9 says, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness…  I will gladly boast about my weaknesses so that the power of Christ may dwell in me… for when I am weak then I am strong.”

Once Jesus had calmed the storm the disciples had a first hand encounter with who he really was – they were amazed that the wind and the storm obeyed him.  Only God has the power to do that!   And it is his strength that empowers and enables us to overcome – to stand strong in the face difficult situations and storms in our life.

In the first lesson, we hear the story of David and Goliath.  An encouraging story for anyone who has felt the need to stand up to a bully or to overcome adversity.  At one time or another we have all faced a giant or two.

But let’s not miss some interesting points.  David, as the youngest in his family, has been off tending the sheep while his older brothers have been training with King Saul and the army.  David comes to check on his brothers because his father, Jesse, said that he should bring them some food and check on their status.  While he is there, David overhears – well everyone can hear – Goliath boasting and calling even taunting the Israelite army.   He is calling for a challenger and the soldiers of Israel are afraid to go up against him.  He is a seasoned warrior and he towers over them – he is dressed in full armour and ready for battle.

David has never been in battle.  In fact, he cannot stand when he tries to wear the armour – he is not strong.  But David knows that Goliath is speaking against God – David sees this not as a battle between himself and Goliath but a battle between God and Goliath and he is certain who will win in that battle!

SO while it is ridiculous to his brothers, that David would be so arrogant as to think that he should go into battle against this massive soldier – this Philistine, all David knows is that God has always been faithful to deliver him in the past.  He recounts the many times that he was able to save the sheep from lions or bears.  He tells these stories not to show how strong he is or how smart he is but to encourage King Saul and the others that God did it.  He emphasizes this in verse 37,

37David said, “The Lord, who saved me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear, will save me from the hand of this Philistine.”

He recognizes that it is not his own strength but God’s.  And God who has been faithful to save him in all the other encounters, will be faithful again.

You see my strength is limited, no matter how hard I work at it – and I intend to work at it – there are always things – circumstances that are Bigger than us. We need to be encouraged and reminded that our God is the creator of the universe – our God speaks to the wind and the waves and they obey.  Our God saves the young shepherd boy from the sword of the giant Goliath.

When Jesus invites us on a journey – when he calls us to go with him to the other side, it is His intention to journey with us.  It is His strength that keeps us safe and strengthens us to step out and do the things that we must do to carry on.   He is always with us and when we are at our weakest – that is when we recognize that these things are beyond our own ability – that is when we really recognize that God is God and depend on Him to be our strength and to deliver us.

As we step forward into that strange world of change that we do not like so much – as we begin this next part of the journey with Jesus Christ – let us remember that He is the one who invited us on this journey and that He who is God, the creator of the universe, is more than able to get us safely to the other side.  Amen.

“I Still Have Many Things To Say…”

The First Reading from I Samuel 15:34- 16:13

34Then Samuel went to Ramah; and Saul went up to his house in Gibeah of Saul. 35Samuel did not see Saul again until the day of his death, but Samuel grieved over Saul. And the Lord was sorry that he had made Saul king over Israel.  The Lord said to Samuel, “How long will you grieve over Saul? I have rejected him from being king over Israel. Fill your horn with oil and set out; I will send you to Jesse the Bethlehemite, for I have provided for myself a king among his sons.” 2Samuel said, “How can I go? If Saul hears of it, he will kill me.” And the Lord said, “Take a heifer with you, and say, ‘I have come to sacrifice to the Lord.’ 3Invite Jesse to the sacrifice, and I will show you what you shall do; and you shall anoint for me the one whom I name to you.” 4Samuel did what the Lord commanded, and came to Bethlehem. The elders of the city came to meet him trembling, and said, “Do you come peaceably?” 5He said, “Peaceably; I have come to sacrifice to the Lord; sanctify yourselves and come with me to the sacrifice.” And he sanctified Jesse and his sons and invited them to the sacrifice.  6When they came, he looked on Eliab and thought, “Surely the Lord’s anointed is now before the Lord.” 7But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not look on his appearance or on the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for the Lord does not see as mortals see; they look on the outward appearance, but the Lord looks on the heart.” 8Then Jesse called Abinadab, and made him pass before Samuel. He said, “Neither has the Lord chosen this one.” 9Then Jesse made Shammah pass by. And he said, “Neither has the Lord chosen this one.” 10Jesse made seven of his sons pass before Samuel, and Samuel said to Jesse, “The Lord has not chosen any of these.” 11Samuel said to Jesse, “Are all your sons here?” And he said, “There remains yet the youngest, but he is keeping the sheep.” And Samuel said to Jesse, “Send and bring him; for we will not sit down until he comes here.” 12He sent and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and had beautiful eyes, and was handsome. The Lord said, “Rise and anoint him; for this is the one.” 13Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed him in the presence of his brothers; and the spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David from that day forward. Samuel then set out and went to Ramah.

The Word of the Lord.          Thanks be to God.

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Mark 4:26-34

26He also said, “The kingdom of God is as if someone would scatter seed on the ground, 27and would sleep and rise night and day, and the seed would sprout and grow, he does not know how. 28The earth produces of itself, first the stalk, then the head, then the full grain in the head. 29But when the grain is ripe, at once he goes in with his sickle, because the harvest has come.”  30He also said, “With what can we compare the kingdom of God, or what parable will we use for it? 31It is like a mustard seed, which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; 32yet when it is sown it grows up and becomes the greatest of all shrubs, and puts forth large branches, so that the birds of the air can make nests in its shade.”  33With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it; 34he did not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything in private to his disciples.

The Gospel of Christ            Praise to you Lord Christ

A homily by Mother Beth – “I Still Have Many Things to Say….” Mark 4

It is difficult to know what to say to you as I am called on to something new.  When we started on this journey in October 2016 I had no idea that God would lead me here to this day at this time.  I remember a familiar reading that I have clung to and mused over in John 16:12-15 and one line in particular stands out to me, “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now.”  I knew from the beginning of this journey that God was leading and that there was more to His plan than what I could see or understand at the time.

The readings from today offer further insight into the great mystery of God and His kingdom and how He plans to bring it about.  In the Samuel reading from this week, the people had called for a King because they wanted to be like the other nations around them.  They wanted to have an earthly leader instead of relying on God and the prophets to lead them.  The people chose Saul – who was every bit the image of a Royal.

HE had the stature and the looks.  IN the reading from today we hear that God has chosen someone else to replace Saul and we get a picture of how God chooses a leader and how different that is from how the people choose.

God chooses differently then we might expect.   We hear in the Samuel passage that “the Lord does not see as mortals see”.   We look on the outward appearance but God looks on the heart. Last week I spoke about God renewing us inwardly day by day and this passage in Samuel fits well with that.  God chooses based on the transformation that can happen or has happened in the heart.   As other have said, He qualifies the chosen – he calls each of us – not because we have it all together – not because we are the best and the brightest – he calls us because he sees the heart and recognizes – surrender and willingness to fulfill his will.   HE calls us not so that we will fulfill OUR plan but so that we will fulfill HIS plan.

God chose David for that very reason.  He knew that David would be willing to seek God’s wisdom and advice and obey and follow God’s direction.  He knew that David – for all his mistakes and missteps – would keep coming back to being open and honest before God.

God will not be controlled.  He does what is unexpected.

One year I planted herbs and when the plants began to grow, it become obvious that somehow a tomato plant had grown as well.  One or two little seeds must have fallen into the packet and I didn’t realize what it was until it was well on its way to being a full blown plant.    Once the fruit came on the plant there was definitely no denying that it was indeed a tomato and not the parsley or sage that it had been planted with.

Today in the readings Jesus tells the people the Kingdom of God is like someone who sows seed and then goes out day after day and discovers that the seed has grown into a plant.   This is the miracle of seeds that you can look into that ground day after day and see nothing and then suddenly, one day there is a green shoot – new life and before you know it – comes the harvest.   Now I realize that farming today is not this simplistic but think back to when you first planted a bean plant in grade school or the first time you planted a flower or vegetable garden from seed.  The early days seem like an endless wait and yet we know that something is happening below the surface of the soil.  The growth is starting on the inside, in the darkness before it is seen above ground.   So we do not lose heart – we walk by faith and not by sight.

In the second parable Jesus tells us that the Kingdom of God is like a mustard seed.  It starts out small but grows into something large.  Mustard like many other invasive plants can take over every place it is allowed to go.  This is a great image of the Kingdom of God.  Jesus is reassuring us that the Kingdom will grow and spread – that once it starts – like that mustard bush – it will multiply and spread and it all starts with one seed.

And although we like to think that we are entirely responsible for the spreading or growing of the Kingdom of God, the truth is God does it.  God does what is unexpected and He will not be controlled by people or the church.  God has a mission and He will bring His plan about with or without us.   He wants us to partner with him. He calls us to be open and willing to fulfill His plan.

For so long we as the church have thought in terms of the church being the mission – we have thought that the whole point of all of this was to get people to come to church.  But the truth is, we as the church should be fulfilling God’s mission – to introduce people to God – to provide an opportunity to meet God and to go from this place and live abundantly in our communities.   God’s mission is not limited within the walls of the church.

The beauty of the parable of planting a seed and then going on with the day to day duties of your life is that it shows us the regularity being about the things of God.  It is in our daily coming and going that the true life of faith is lived.   We make it hard on ourselves.  We think it is about a huge evangelistic meeting or that we need to be at the church every day of the week – that is what it means to be called or to work with God on His mission.  But the truth is, God is looking at the heart, He is calling to you and I to live our lives faithfully in the community.  God is doing the hard work – He invites us to be part of the big and unexpected things by planting a seed – by loving each other, by extending to a friend or neighbour, by standing strong in the face of trials or troubles.  He calls us to be part of the big picture by being faithful in our little corner of the field – what little seed has God given you to plant today?

As we faithfully plant those seeds in the lives of others – in the lives of the community, God will be faithful to provide the growth and His kingdom will spread and grow to the ends of the earth.  Amen.

Go Where I Send You

Exodus 3:1-15

Moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law Jethro, the priest of Midian; he led his flock beyond the wilderness, and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. 2There the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire out of a bush; he looked, and the bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. 3Then Moses said, “I must turn aside and look at this great sight, and see why the bush is not burned up.” 4When the Lord saw that he had turned aside to see, God called to him out of the bush, “Moses, Moses!” And he said, “Here I am.” 5Then he said, “Come no closer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.” 6He said further, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob.” And Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at God.  7Then the Lord said, “I have observed the misery of my people who are in Egypt; I have heard their cry on account of their taskmasters. Indeed, I know their sufferings, 8and I have come down to deliver them from the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land to a good and broad land, a land flowing with milk and honey, to the country of the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites. 9The cry of the Israelites has now come to me; I have also seen how the Egyptians oppress them. 10So come, I will send you to Pharaoh to bring my people, the Israelites, out of Egypt.”  11But Moses said to God, “Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh, and bring the Israelites out of Egypt?” 12He said, “I will be with you; and this shall be the sign for you that it is I who sent you: when you have brought the people out of Egypt, you shall worship God on this mountain.” 13But Moses said to God, “If I come to the Israelites and say to them, ‘The God of your ancestors has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” 14God said to Moses, “I AM WHO I AM.” He said further, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘I AM has sent me to you.’“ 15God also said to Moses, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you’: This is my name forever, and this my title for all generations.

 

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew 16:13-20

21From that time on, Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering at the hands of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.22And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him, saying, “God forbid it, Lord! This must never happen to you.” 23But he turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; for you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.”  24Then Jesus told his disciples, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 25For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. 26For what will it profit them if they gain the whole world but forfeit their life? Or what will they give in return for their life? 27“For the Son of Man is to come with his angels in the glory of his Father, and then he will repay everyone for what has been done. 28Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.”

Go Where I Send You – a homily for September 3

One of the dangers of hearing a sermon on such a familiar passage that many of us have watched over and over again on the big screen,  is that we all think we know exactly what happens in the passage.  When we read about Moses we picture Charlton Heston, who by the way, was replaced by Christian Bale in the new movie version of the Exodus story entitled Gods and Kings.  The danger is that whether or not the movie depicted it rightly, we assume that we know how it all goes and sometimes movie producers do not worry about biblical or historical accuracy.  So I suggest that we look at Exodus chapter three with a conscious effort to hearing the story as it appears in scripture as opposed to how we assume it goes.

This week in Chapter 3 we hear about Moses out tending his father-in-law’s sheep.

So what happened to lead Moses to this place? When we left him last he was a baby being rescued from the water.   To recap chapter two…. Moses grew up in the palace of the Egytian Pharaoh he was raised as a prince and yet he was watching out for the welfare of the Israelite people.  When he sees an Israelite worker being treated unjustly, he acts on the worker’s behalf; challenging the Egyptian and fighting with him and killing him.    Moses goes out the next day to watch over the Israelites and when he tries to settle a dispute it becomes obvious that the two workers are aware that he killed the Egyptian supervisor the day before.   When the news gets to Pharaoh, Pharaoh threatens Moses so, Moses leaves – flees the area and ends up at the well where Jethro’s daughters are drawing water.    Moses defends the women who are being harassed by some men near the well.  Moses marries one of Jethro’s daughters and he stays to work for Jethro.

(Note Moses is born in 1526 and the Exodus happens in 1406). Moses has been working for Jethro about 40 years at this point.

Remember that the children of Israel are waiting for deliverance and that Moses has been doing the everyday work of a shepherd.  Things did not just happen overnight.  We see the story as an action movie which quickly moves from one scene to the next but I want us to notice that there was patience involved – there was time involved.  God’s plan happens in God’s time.  We don’t always understand what takes the time but we need to remember that God has not forgotten us.  God has a plan that will happen in God’s time.

So while Moses is out tending the sheep he notices a bush that is burning but not consumed by fire.  He makes a point to go and find out what is happening with this bush.

Are we too busy going about our own business to be interrupted by God?  Do we notice when something is trying to get our attention?  Do we take the time to stop and check it out?

The Lord calls to Moses “when he turned aside to see”.  If Moses had not stopped, would the Lord have called out to him?

When the Lord calls out to Moses, Moses responds saying, “Here I am”

This is a response of availability.

5Then he said, “Come no closer! Remove the sandals from your feet, for the place on which you are standing is holy ground.”

Sandals – are protection – keeping feet safe from things in and on the soil.  Sandals are status – many people did not have sandals and sandals then, as shoes today, would show various levels of income.  To remove your sandals is to identify with the poor and afflicted – to stand in humility.

When my father was a child – his father went to town and bought the shoes and clothes for everyone for a year – it was not about choosing the fit or the style – it was very practical – it was covering you so that you could do the work around the farm.  Others would know that those shoes were not about fashion but about practicality and frugalness.

Are we prepared to shed our shoes and whatever our shoes say about us or provide for us – so that we can stand vulnerable and available before almighty God?  Do we recognize that we protect ourselves; putting up defenses – wearing armour around others but that we need to shed that armour – that pretense before God?

God identifies himself to Moses – “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob”We don’t know that Moses ever knew his father and yet God starts by saying

I am the God of your father.  We know that his father was a Levite – a man from the tribe of Levi – this is the tribe that was not promised land but given the role of the priesthood.

God commissions Moses to go on his behalf I will send you to Pharaoh to bring my people, the Israelites, out of Egypt.”

And now Moses initial response of availability “Here I am” becomes “Who am I?”  Isn’t that our natural response as well.

When God calls we would be most happy to say here I am but, it is not long before we ask, “Who am I to do this thing?”  We question God’s wisdom at choosing us.  We wonder what would make us a likely candidate to go and do what God asks.  Surely there is someone more suited to the task.  There must be someone with better qualifications.  Maybe we are able to look at the call of Moses and see how obvious it is that God has prepared him especially for this task.

Moses with his foot in both worlds – A Hebrew raised in the Egyptian palace – he would know how to go before the Pharaoh – he might even already have some rapport in the king’s court.  He has clearly already shown himself concerned with the welfare of others – in protecting the Hebrew slaves to the point of death and then protecting Jethro’s daughters at the well.

But, when the call comes for ourselves it can be much more difficult to see how God has been preparing us and the circumstances around us.  We quickly question, “Who am I?”

God responds to Moses, “I will go with you”.  And that is what we need to hear today as well.  God says to you and I, “Go where I send you and I will go with you”. Moses continues to ask some questions – If the people ask me who sent me, then what do I say?  Basically he is asking, “what is your name, God?”  How do I refer to you so that they will be convinced that I am coming on your behalf?

And God responds, “I AM WHO I AM.” He said further, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘I AM has sent me to you.’“ 15God also said to Moses, “Thus you shall say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your ancestors, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you’: This is my name forever, and this my title for all generations.

Please note that God is not “I was”.  God is I am –  His identity is constant – there is no changing – no evolving – no developing  – the God who Moses stands before is the same God who we stand before today.

“I am” is a powerful name.  Later in the gospels when Jesus is asked about his identity, He will respond “I am he” and it is a powerful reminder that they are the same God.

We have an interesting play with words in this chapter.  Moses responds, “Here I am” and then questions, “Who am I?”  and God sums it all up by naming himself, “I am who I am.”

The truth is, it is not important who Moses is – God chose him and uses him but God is the one who is important.  God will deliver the children of Israel – Moses has a part to play in it but, it is not something that he can do on his own or in his own strength.

The call of God involves a surrender of self.   We hear this especially today in the gospel lesson.  Peter has an idea of how things are going to happen.  He will defend Jesus against any sort of surrendering or suffering and yet Jesus recognizes this is not the way God has planned.  To suffer and die is the very thing that Jesus needs to do.  And so, Jesus rebukes Peter and proceeds to explain God’s plan.  “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 25For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it.”   God calls us from selfishness or self-centeredness towards his plan – his concerns.  God points to those things that He is concerned about.

And the more we notice those things, the more we empathize with others, the more we are aligning our will with his.  This is what it means to take up our cross – to focus on those things that are on God’s heart – to reorient our lives toward the Kingdom of God.

God calls us today saying, Go where I send you – I will go with you and if anyone asks who has sent you, you should respond “I am who I am”.  We go into the world to offer God’s grace and mercy and deliverance and we go knowing that wherever we go, God goes with us.  Amen.

The Wheat and the Weeds

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew 13:24-43

24He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; 25but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away. 26So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared as well. 27And the slaves of the householder came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where, then, did these weeds come from?’ 28He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ The slaves said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ 29But he replied, ‘No; for in gathering the weeds you would uproot the wheat along with them. 30Let both of them grow together until the harvest; and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Collect the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’” 31He put before them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed that someone took and sowed in his field; 32it is the smallest of all the seeds, but when it has grown it is the greatest of shrubs and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and make nests in its branches.” 33He told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it was leavened.” 34Jesus told the crowds all these things in parables; without a parable he told them nothing. 35This was to fulfill what had been spoken through the prophet: “I will open my mouth to speak in parables; I will proclaim what has been hidden from the foundation of the world.” 36Then he left the crowds and went into the house. And his disciples approached him, saying, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds of the field.” 37He answered, “The one who sows the good seed is the Son of Man; 38the field is the world, and the good seed are the children of the kingdom; the weeds are the children of the evil one, 39and the enemy who sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the age, and the reapers are angels. 40Just as the weeds are collected and burned up with fire, so will it be at the end of the age.41The Son of Man will send his angels, and they will collect out of his kingdom all causes of sin and all evildoers, 42and they will throw them into the furnace of fire, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. 43Then the righteous will shine like the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Let anyone with ears listen!       The Gospel of Christ.

The Wheat and the Weeds – A Homily by Mother Beth

I read a story online recently about a woman who had cancelled her wedding and she was told by the hotel (where the reception was to be held) that she would be unable to get a refund on her deposit because it was too close to the date and the food was already purchased.  The woman and her fiancé decided that they did not want the money or the food to go to waste.  So the woman decided that she would host a party for all of the homeless people in the neighbourhood.   She would go ahead with the party.  I mention this story because when I heard it, it made me think of the kind of story Jesus might tell.  The kingdom of God is like a man who invited his friends to a banquet…  So my first question for you today is “Do you see images or pictures of what God is doing or wants to do when you look around the community?”  Are there life-giving things happening around you that remind and encourage you to be about kingdom business.  I pray that God would open my eyes more and more to the things around me – the places where He is working to show us what His kingdom is really like.

We hear about three images or parables that Jesus told in the Gospel of Matthew today.  And as an overall message of the whole passage I would say that the images of wheat, seeds and yeast that Jesus uses in this passage to create a picture of the kingdom seem to speak at least one common idea.  The spreading and Growth of the kingdom is happening – slow and steady – we should be patient and keep on keeping on.

In the first parable about the wheat and the tares, we hear that “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to someone who sowed good seed in his field; 25but while everybody was asleep, an enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and then went away.”  When the slaves noticed that there were weeds growing then they came and asked, Master did you not sow good seed in the field? =

How many times in your life have you wanted to ask God if he has sown good seed in the field?  You look around at the way things are going – in the world – in the nation – in your community – in your life.  And you think – Really?  Is this what it is supposed to be like?  Is this what God intends to have happen?  Well yes and no.

Yes God has sown the good seed and there are good things growing and no not all the things that are happening around us are the result of that seed.  The master explains to the slaves that the enemy has also sown seed – some of the stuff around us and some of the things that are happening are a result of the enemy’s seed.

And so the slaves say, as we might, shouldn’t we pull out all the weeds – shouldn’t we get rid of all the bad stuff???  Wouldn’t we love to live a world where everything was ordered and went according to our plan?  Wouldn’t it be nice if everyone did as we do and thought like we think?

But the Master responds explaining; the wheat and the weeds are growing together and if you pull out the weeds you will disturb and destroy some of the wheat.

If any of you are gardeners you will have realized that sometimes weeds look like the plants –they grow near – they masquerade as it were.  What you see is not always what you get.

 

 

There are weeds that are fake versions of plants.  Unless you are a very adept gardener, how do you know the difference?   Well you don’t  – until it comes to bearing fruit you can’t tell which is the weed and which is the plant. We are known by our fruit.

Matt 7:16 “By their fruit you will recognize them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles?”

Don’t worry that you will not be recognized by God – the fruit that you bear will be obvious to God and to others.  God knows the difference between wheat and weeds and He is the one that matters.

This can be difficult for us because we want to stand out – we want to be recognized – we want to be affirmed.   Well, let it become obvious – not in an obnoxious way – not in waving a banner about how great you are – or calling attention to yourself but by bearing good fruit.  What is the fruit that we are called to bear… the fruit of the Spirit.

Galatians  5:  22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.

God is the one who decides who is “in” and who is “out” not us

I recently read a little saying…

“While I was busy judging others, I left the closet door open and a bunch of skeletons fell out.”

Our temptation often, is to look around and to try make sense of things by sorting people into categories.   But, what if we stopped trying to figure out who is “in”and who is “out” and loved everyone?  What if we spoke hope and peace to everyone?  What if we actually took God at his word when he told us to “Love the Lord your God with all your heart soul, mind, and strength and love your neighbour ‘as yourself”?  What impact might that have?  How would things change for us and for our community?

In looking back at the picture that Jesus gives us of wheat and weeds, we know that weeds don’t become wheat so the analogy stops there.  But we do know that we are new creatures through Jesus Christ and we know that God wants to transform others as well.

So can the people around us  – even those that look like weeds to us – can they be transformed into new creatures?  Isn’t that how we got to be part of the kingdom of God – someone, maybe many someone’s did not give up on us!    They loved us.  They prayed for us.  They spoke words of hope and encouragement to us.

Let us keep doing the kingdom work and trust God to sort out the rest.   The great news that we hear in the gospel this morning is that God is responsible for what happens on the day of judgment.  It is not my responsibility or your responsibility to determine the outcome of each other’s lives.   We can trust that the master has planted good seed in the field and that he knows the difference between wheat and weeds.  In the meantime, we are called to bear fruit. We are called to be evidence of the good seed and in so doing to have an impact on the field, the family, the community, the nation where we are planted.  Amen.

 

God’s Generosity of Grace

 

The First Reading from  Genesis 25:19-3419These are the descendants of Isaac, Abraham’s son: Abraham was the father of Isaac, 20and Isaac was forty years old when he married Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel the Aramean of Paddan-aram, sister of Laban the Aramean. 21Isaac prayed to the Lord for his wife, because she was barren; and the Lord granted his prayer, and his wife Rebekah conceived. 22The children struggled together within her; and she said, “If it is to be this way, why do I live?” So she went to inquire of the Lord.23And the Lord said to her, “Two nations are in your womb, and two peoples born of you shall be divided; the one shall be stronger than the other, the elder shall serve the younger.” 24When her time to give birth was at hand, there were twins in her womb. 25The first came out red, all his body like a hairy mantle; so they named him Esau. 26Afterward his brother came out, with his hand gripping Esau’s heel; so he was named Jacob. Isaac was sixty years old when she bore them. 27When the boys grew up, Esau was a skillful hunter, a man of the field, while Jacob was a quiet man, living in tents. 28Isaac loved Esau, because he was fond of game; but Rebekah loved Jacob.   29Once when Jacob was cooking a stew, Esau came in from the field, and he was famished. 30Esau said to Jacob, “Let me eat some of that red stuff, for I am famished!” (Therefore he was called Edom.) 31Jacob said, “First sell me your birthright.” 32Esau said, “I am about to die; of what use is a birthright to me?” 33Jacob said, “Swear to me first.” So he swore to him, and sold his birthright to Jacob. 34Then Jacob gave Esau bread and lentil stew, and he ate and drank, and rose and went his way. Thus Esau despised his birthright.

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew 13:1-23

13That same day Jesus went out of the house and sat beside the sea.2Such great crowds gathered around him that he got into a boat and sat there, while the whole crowd stood on the beach. 3And he told them many things in parables, saying: “Listen! A sower went out to sow.4And as he sowed, some seeds fell on the path, and the birds came and ate them up. 5Other seeds fell on rocky ground, where they did not have much soil, and they sprang up quickly, since they had no depth of soil.6But when the sun rose, they were scorched; and since they had no root, they withered away. 7Other seeds fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked them. 8Other seeds fell on good soil and brought forth grain, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. 9Let anyone with ears listen!” 10Then the disciples came and asked him, “Why do you speak to them in parables?” 11He answered, “To you it has been given to know the secrets of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it has not been given.12For to those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away. 13The reason I speak to them in parables is that ‘seeing they do not perceive, and hearing they do not listen, nor do they understand.’ 14With them indeed is fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah that says: ‘You will indeed listen, but never understand, and you will indeed look, but never perceive. 15For this people’s heart has grown dull, and their ears are hard of hearing, and they have shut their eyes; so that they might not look with their eyes, and listen with their ears, and understand with their heart and turn— and I would heal them.’ 16But blessed are your eyes, for they see, and your ears, for they hear. 17Truly I tell you, many prophets and righteous people longed to see what you see, but did not see it, and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it. 18“Hear then the parable of the sower. 19When anyone hears the word of the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what is sown in the heart; this is what was sown on the path. 20As for what was sown on rocky ground, this is the one who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy; 21yet such a person has no root, but endures only for a while, and when trouble or persecution arises on account of the word, that person immediately falls away. 22As for what was sown among thorns, this is the one who hears the word, but the cares of the world and the lure of wealth choke the word, and it yields nothing. 23But as for what was sown on good soil, this is the one who hears the word and understands it, who indeed bears fruit and yields, in one case a hundredfold, in another sixty, and in another thirty.”       

 

God’s Generosity of Grace  a homily by Mother Beth

The story is told that one day a beggar by the roadside asked for alms from Alexander the Great as he passed by. The man was poor and wretched and had no claim upon the ruler, no right even to lift a solicitous hand. Yet the Emperor threw him several gold coins. A courtier was astonished at his generosity and commented, “Sir, copper coins would adequately meet a beggar’s need. Why give him gold?” Alexander responded in royal fashion, “Copper coins would suit the beggar’s need, but gold coins suit Alexander’s giving.”

This week we pick up our Genesis reading with Isaac and Rebekah.  Isaac prays to the Lord on behalf of his wife because she is unable to have children.  Isaac is forty when he starts praying and the he is sixty when the children are born so although the response to Issac’s prayer is handled here in one verse and   sounds like a quick response to Isaac’s effective prayer – recognize that there is time involved – there is patience involved – there is faith involved.  Isaac believes through all the years of difficulty that Rebekah will bear children.  Often it is easy to lose hope and to assume that God has forgotten us or chosen not to answer us but do not despair – God is faithful.

As Rebekah carries the children – it is not a comfortable pregnancy – the twins wrestle within her.  And when she asks God what is happening – He tells her, “Two nations are in your womb, and two peoples from within you will be separated; one people will be stronger than the other, and the older will serve the younger.”

So Esau and Jacob are born and we are given the detail that Jacob is born second but comes out of his mother’s womb grasping the heal of Esau and we recognize that this will be significant because we have already heard the prophecy that the older child will serve the younger.

And if we had any doubt that parents really do love all their children the same it is refuted right here – Isaac loved Esau but Rebekah loved Jacob.

Favoritism happens in families – we are more comfortable with someone’s personality or we are proud of so and so’s accomplishments.  We are drawn more easily into dealing with certain situations and things just get too complicated with that person – whatever our reasoning – we choose our favorites.

So one day Jacob was making stew and Esau came in from hunting and was very hungry.  Esau demands that Jacob give him some of the stew.  And Jacob sees this as an opportunity.  HE asks Esau to sell his birthright for a bowl of the stew.  I am sure that many times children – boys or girls – barter with their siblings.  I often hear my boys negotiating a deal – if one of them has money and the other needs some – or if one is buying or getting something then the other will encourage or advise what to buy so that it will come out to their advantage or at least so that they can both benefit from the transaction.

Jacob is an opportunist.  He sees how hungry his brother is and I am sure that he has learned from past experience that Esau is all about instant gratification, so he strikes on this particular opportunity.  Esau sells his birthright for a bowl of stew.

Honestly it seems to me that neither of these men are painted in the best light.  Who thinks so little of their birthright that they would sell it for a meal?  Who is that impetuous?  But, we could also say, who is so opportunistic that they take advantage of the situation and offer so little?

Who would take the birthright from their own sibling?

Now, we know that God had already prophesied that the older would serve the younger AND that both men will be great nations and be blessed.

God chose Jacob before his birth – a choice that is more about who God is than about who Jacob is.  God is generous with grace and he gives as a sign of who he is and not because of who the receiver is.

In the gospel reading for today we hear the parable of the sower.  And many times I suspect we have focused on the different kinds of soil that the seed is planted into.  And the parable does emphasize the fact that the difference in the soil makes the difference in the growth of the plant.  I remember when we lived in North Bay and we bought our first house.  I was exploring the property and there was a small shed just along the property line.  I went to look around the shed as I was planning where I would plant a garden and as I looked behind the shed in this sheltered location – there blooming in all its beauty was a clematis.  I was struck by how ridiculous this seemed – no one could see this plant from most of the yard.  You literally had to step back behind the shed and crane your neck around to see it.  But there it was blooming away – loving that secluded spot.   A clematis wasting away its beauty in some hidden spot reminded me of how extravagant God is.  God’s grace extends to all and there is no way to earn it – it is not about how well we are situated – it is not about being nice people or being born into the right family.

The sower scatters the seed generously – and some seed falls on the path – some seed falls on rocky ground – some seed falls among the thorns and still other seed falls on good soil.

God is generous with grace and he scatters it liberally.  That is the good news – God’s grace is extravagantly tossed about.

Sometimes it occurs to me that we are too careful with it.  We want to know that we are only sowing in good soil.  We want to know that the person deserves to hear the good news or that they will respond positively before we tell them.  We are stingy with the love and grace of God.  We are calculating – not wanting to waste what God has so generously bestowed on us.  God gives to us generously so that we can generously give to others.  God chose Jacob – extending grace to him – not because he deserved to be chosen but because God uses whomever he chooses.  The sower sows the seed generously in order to get a generous harvest.  The parable is a picture of the faithfulness of the sower – to keep sowing extravagantly all around.
Only God sees the heart – only God knows when someone is ready to hear the word and receive it.  We need to seize any and all opportunities to sow the seed generously and to trust that God’s grace extends toward us and toward others.   We do not get to decide who will respond or when they will respond just as others could not decide for us.

Wayne Gretzky has been quoted as saying, “This one thing I know that you miss 100% of the shots that you don’t take.”   And the same is true for us.  We may not know who is ready to respond to God’s love and grace but if we never sow the seed then you can be sure that we will not have had a hand in the harvest.

God chooses who he will and we need to leave the results to him.  As we have generously received from God’s hand so we should generously give without partiality.  May God help us to love unconditionally, to be gracious and merciful to those around us and to sow generously into the lives of those in our community.  Amen.

 

God Alone is Trustworthy

Sunday July 9th – God Alone is Trustworthy

The First Reading from  Genesis 24:34-67

34So he said, “I am Abraham’s servant. 35The Lord has greatly blessed my master, and he has become wealthy; he has given him flocks and herds, silver and gold, male and female slaves, camels and donkeys.36And Sarah my master’s wife bore a son to my master when she was old; and he has given him all that he has. 37My master made me swear, saying, ‘You shall not take a wife for my son from the daughters of the Canaanites, in whose land I live; 38but you shall go to my father’s house, to my kindred, and get a wife for my son.’  42“I came today to the spring, and said, ‘O Lord, the God of my master Abraham, if now you will only make successful the way I am going! 43I am standing here by the spring of water; let the young woman who comes out to draw, to whom I shall say, “Please give me a little water from your jar to drink,” 44and who will say to me, “Drink, and I will draw for your camels also” —let her be the woman whom the Lord has appointed for my master’s son.’ 45“Before I had finished speaking in my heart, there was Rebekah coming out with her water jar on her shoulder; and she went down to the spring, and drew. I said to her, ‘Please let me drink.’ 46She quickly let down her jar from her shoulder, and said, ‘Drink, and I will also water your camels.’ So I drank, and she also watered the camels. 47Then I asked her, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ She said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, Nahor’s son, whom Milcah bore to him.’ So I put the ring on her nose, and the bracelets on her arms. 48Then I bowed my head and worshiped the Lord, and blessed the Lord, the God of my master Abraham, who had led me by the right way to obtain the daughter of my master’s kinsman for his son. 49Now then, if you will deal loyally and truly with my master, tell me; and if not, tell me, so that I may turn either to the right hand or to the left.”  58And they called Rebekah, and said to her, “Will you go with this man?” She said, “I will.” 59So they sent away their sister Rebekah and her nurse along with Abraham’s servant and his men.60And they blessed Rebekah and said to her, “May you, our sister, become thousands of myriads; may your offspring gain possession of the gates of their foes.” 61Then Rebekah and her maids rose up, mounted the camels, and followed the man; thus the servant took Rebekah, and went his way. 62Now Isaac had come from Beer-lahai-roi, and was settled in the Negeb.63Isaac went out in the evening to walk in the field; and looking up, he saw camels coming. 64And Rebekah looked up, and when she saw Isaac, she slipped quickly from the camel, 65and said to the servant, “Who is the man over there, walking in the field to meet us?” The servant said, “It is my master.” So she took her veil and covered herself. 66And the servant told Isaac all the things that he had done. 67Then Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah’s tent. He took Rebekah, and she became his wife; and he loved her. So Isaac was comforted after his mother’s death.

 

The Holy Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew 11:16-19,25-30

16“But to what will I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling to one another, 17‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we wailed, and you did not mourn.’ 18For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon’;19the Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Look, a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is vindicated by her deeds.”  25At that time Jesus said, “I thank you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; 26yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. 27All things have been handed over to me by my Father; and no one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. 28“Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. 29Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

God alone is Trustworthy – a Homily by Mother Beth

In preparing to teach Vacation Bible School one year a co-leader and I looked over the lessons together.  All of the Bible Stories are taken from the Old Testament or the Hebrew Bible.  We were looking at the lives of Moses, Esther, Daniel, Jeremiah and Joshua.  The curriculum offered a tie-in to the gospels for each day but my co-leader and I were discussing the fact that these great stories quite easily stand on their own.  For sure all of scripture points to the gospel and we should quick to acknowledge that the Old Testament and New Testament both point to the same God – the Creator of the Universe.  But my co-leader and I were talking about how great the life lessons and stories of the Old Testament are.

In fact, I should tell you, I am an Old Testament gal – I love those great adventure stories – the superhero scale of things – the God who triumphs when all looks lost.   Those stories captured my heart and imagination as a young girl – I read and re-read them.

I encourage you if you have not read through Genesis and Exodus especially you should do so.  Find an easy to read translation and read through several chapters at a time so that you get the rhythm and theme of the story.  Alright, point made – Now I will move on to the lesson for today.

We come into the story of Abraham and Isaac at a time shortly after Sarah (Isaac’s mother) has died and Abraham realizes that Isaac needs to take a wife.  Isaac’s wife will be the matriarch of the family.  This story is important because Isaac is supposed to carry on Abraham’s family line and as a bachelor there is a problem – no kids means no one to take over from you – so God’s promise to Abraham that he would be a great nation and his descendants would be as many as the stars in the sky – could end right here.  So Abraham sends his servant back to the land of Nahor (where he came from back in Genesis 12) so that Isaac can marry someone from his own tribe – his own extended family.

There are a couple of things to note here – 1) the servant is not named although some people think it is Eleazar who before Ishmael and Isaac came along would have inherited all of Abraham’s wealth.  But really the point is the servant is not named because the story is not about him – it is about Isaac and his wife to be. 2) Isaac does not go himself – the servant is sent on his behalf because he is too upset to go but more importantly Abraham has no intention of sending Isaac back to the place from which he has come.  The future is ahead of them.

The faith and trust of God is amazing in this story – Abraham trusts that God will direct his servant to bring back a wife for his son.   The verses that the lectionary leaves out make it clear as Abraham says, “‘The Lord, before whom I walk, will send his angel with you and make your way successful.”

This is more than an arranged marriage – this is a divinely ordained marriage.  This marriage is arranged by supernatural intervention.  Abraham makes it clear that his trust is in God so much so that he promises that the servant will not be held responsible for the results – just go and do and say what I have instructed you to do and if no one comes with you then you are released from the process. God directs and works through people but we are not to put our trust in the person but in God.  As I said last week, Abraham trusts that God has a plan and that God’s plan is better than anything that he can imagine for himself.

Doesn’t that sound familiar?  Each week at the end of the Eucharist we say,. Glory to God whose power working in us can do more than we can ask or imagine.  Who are you trusting?  Who are you not trusting?  God is trustworthy.  We hear these stories so that they will remind us of all the times and in all the ways that God has proven Himself to be trustworthy.

So the servant goes and does what Abraham has told him – he stops at a well and prays that God will make him successful in his quest.  You might realize that wells are places where people meet – Jacob will meet Rachel at a well, Moses meets his wife Zipporah at a well – it is a common meeting place.

The servant makes a plan with God about what he will say and how he will recognize who is the right girl.  He decides that he will ask for a drink and will know it is the right person when the woman not only is willing to give him a drink but volunteers to water the camels also.

Her willingness to go above and beyond what she is asked will demonstrate – openness and hospitality.

Just as the servant finishes praying, Rebekah approaches the well and fulfills his request.  When he asks about her lineage it turns out that she is the daughter of Isaac’s cousin so the servant realizes this is the one that God has sent him for.

Rebekah’s willingness to go with the servant to meet a man that she has never seen demonstrates tremendous faith.  She is not forced to go – she chooses to go and it is her willingness to cooperate and fulfill God’s plan that makes her part of something so much bigger.  She now becomes part of the line of faith.  Rebekah demonstrates a similar faith to that of Abraham who left his home for an unknown land to respond to God’s call.

The family wants Rebekah to stay with them for ten more days and be prepared to marry but the servant refuses to wait and the question is posed to Rebekah, “will you go with this man?”  Will you seize this opportunity or will you let tradition or reason delay you?  Rebekah heeds the call – “Yes, I will go with this man!”

In what ways have we responded to God’s call?  In what ways have we delayed responding because we wanted to get our act together first – there were plans to be made and traditions to observe?

My own story of being called to ministry took a roundabout way of being fulfilled.  From an early age my heart was captivated by God and by these stories of faith.   I held many positions in church – Sunday School teacher, and Bible Study leader.   I worked for Youth for Christ and Campus Crusade for Christ and then as an adult I worked for Pioneer Clubs in their head office and whenever I felt like God was calling me to pursue a calling to the ordained ministry, I would justify my position by saying that I have done as much as I need to do.  I went to tour a Bible School in the States and I looked for every possible problem that I could find so that I could say no, it is not right for me to go.     I met Steve and we got married – he was in fulltime ministry as a youth minister and so I worked alongside him and did everything I could to support his ministry but God kept calling me.  And for the longest time, I kept saying, I think I am doing enough.  Plus, I said my kids are young and now is not a good time.

Many people had come and talked to me on different occasions about being called to ministry – some I suspect I rudely put off – Yes, I have thought about it and NO it is not for me!  Finally, when we moved to Barrie, Ontario, Canada in 2006, I was willing to think about going back to school and hearing what God would say to me.

I tell you this not to say that you are all called to go back to seminary and become ordained ministers but to say that I know what it is like to feel the constant nudging and to ignore it – I know what it is like to be presented with an opportunity and to not be ready to embrace it.   God is trustworthy – his track record speaks to his faithfulness.  May God help us to be open and willing to respond when God calls as Rebekah was with the servant – Yes, I will go!  And if we have not yet heard that call, may God be faithful to keep calling and nudging until we are ready to hear and respond.  Amen.